Posts Tagged ‘business experience’

Burnout!?!

December 12th, 2017

BURNOUT, it is not all the employee’s fault!

 

Too much stress can lead to burnout

A few Fridays ago I sat with someone and we talked through some of the stress she is facing at work. It’s a lot of stress, and I cannot imagine how that company system is going to continue. The level of expectation on employees and the speed of change is no sustainable.

 

You see, the company has decided to take the term “Agile” and apply it to everyone and everything in the whole company: work faster, smarter, more flexible, ever more responsibility.

Agile can be difficult when applied to a whole company

Except there is a big problem: people are human and there is a limit to the speed and efficiency they can reach and work at in a sustainable manner. At my friend’s work place burnout is common and heart attacks and strokes happen, and not just to “fat old men”.

 

This expectancy of ever more perfect employees is a worrisome pattern in many of today’s leading companies. Agile is not just for R&D/Tech., it’s an excuse for companies to use and abuse their employees. Yet their employees are the company’s most valuable asset, and many of them are now sick with burnout and other stress-related illnesses.

 

Here is what the World Health Organization says about burnout:

“Over the past 20 years one of the most significant changes to workplaces in industrialized countries has been the relative decline in permanent full-time employment and a corresponding growth of what has been termed precarious employment or contingent work arrangements… Widespread and often repeated restructuring/downsizing and outsourcing by large private and public employers has increased insecurity amongst workers previously presumed to have secure jobs.” All this causes burnout. “And burnout syndrome includes the following three dimensions:

emotional exhaustion;
depersonalization; and
reduced personal accomplishment
http://www.who.int/occupational_health/publications/newsletter/en/gohnet2e.pdf

Locally speaking, according to KMU Magazin, (nr. 2, 2009), Switzerland has a burnout bill of over 18 billion francs! That is an amazingly high number! Companies need to realize that this phenomenon is not about the individual employee, but about the company culture, the company system and when there is a seriously high level of long-term, stress-related illness and burnout, the company needs to look at itself and ask some questions about how they “do business”!

So, what can be done about this problem:

  • First, have healthy expectations of yourself, your co-workers and your employees.
  • Second, allow a culture of failure and learning become the norm. Let yourself – and your team – grow from mistakes instead of trying to be like robots.
  • Third, when people start to experience burnout, do not shame them, but instead, help them to get the care they need as soon as possible.
  • Finally, create healthy work expectations and systems. Remember that you and your employees are humans, not machines.

This is just a beginning, but a necessary one to starting off towards sustainable growth and development, instead of using and abusing employees until they are not of any use to anyone anymore.

Here are some (non-exhaustive) signs of burnout:

  • You hate Sunday night because you have to go to work in the morning
  • Tiredness (often with insomnia), stress-related health problems, difficulty concentrating
  • Emotional problems like irritability, resentment, apathy, boredom
  • Making more mistakes than you usually do, uncommon procrastination
  • Conflicts are increasing, needing to prove or defend yourself in an unhealthy manner
  • Use of unhealthy coping mechanisms (drugs/alcohol, food, shopping)
  • Withdrawal, inner emptiness, depression

Even though it is not just the responsibility of the employee, if you are starting to experience burnout, here are some things you can do:

  • Focus on your (home, not work) relationships– talk about your feelings and frustrations with trusted friends and family.
  • Do things that you can change, be in control of (google Coveys’ list of things you can change).
  • Choose to believe that your (good) actions will lead to (good) feelings—in other words, fight against negativity with positive actions, not just words.
  • Accept yourself as good enough and be realistic about your goals and expectations
  • Pay attention to your emotional and physical needs. Listen to your body and give it some good care.
  • Maybe you need to do some soul searching about what (and how) you are doing for work. Maybe you need to change some things. Take time to reflect on this.

I wish you a very healthy – and – sustainable month and 2018!

Patricia Jehle            www.jehle-coaching.com                patricia@jehle-coaching.com

 

 

 

One life: many careers?

November 28th, 2017

More than one career? How do you deal with it?

Are you a slash? I am!

A slash is someone who has more than one career, who perhaps, has made a second career out of a hobby or passion. A slash can transition you from one stage in life to another or it can accompany your other career through most of your life.

I am a slash and I have friends and family who are also slashes:

My cousin Mark, for example, is an engineer, project manager and coming up towards retirement. He also, along with his wife, makes soda, mainly rootbeer, in a huge pole barn next to his house. Mark Glewwe of Glewwe Castle Brewery produces black cherry, cream, orange, gingerale, raspberry gingerale, and ginger beer besides the spicy adult-flavored rootbeer. He has been doing this for years and is quite famous among the Minnesota rootbeer and other specialty soda fans. Glewwe Castle Brewery is doing well, so well, in fact, that local beer breweries and bars have begun to order his soft drinks for their customers’ use. What is next? Only he and his wife, Laurel, are in the know. We Swiss relatives are hoping for a “factory” here!

My second cousin, Eleanor Glewwe (niece of Mark’s), is a two-time author of YA science fiction and fantasy, publishing with Penguin/Random House. In her other slash, she is getting a PhD in linguistics at UCLA. Her books, Sparkers and Wildings are quite thought provoking and still fun to read. Eleanor may have other slashes in her future. Her personal website says it all: “I was born in Washington, D.C. and grew up in Maryland and Minnesota. I have a BA in Linguistics and Languages (French and Chinese) from Swarthmore College and have also studied at Université Stendhal, Grenoble III. When not doing linguistics, I write books for children. My hobbies include playing the cello (and, more recently, fiddle), folk dancing, shape note singing, and singing in Datvebis Gundi, the UCLA Georgian chorus.”

My friend Doug Brouwer is a pastor and an author. After a very successful 40-year career in ministry, both in the US and Switzerland, Doug is retiring early to concentrate on his other passion, writing. I was honored to have been in a writers’ group with Doug a few years ago. Besides books, Doug writes a blog, too:  http://www.dougsblog.org

Another friend, Sarah Tesnjak, is a singer, a furniture restorer, and a budding coach. She hopes to also add speaker to her slashes. Sarah has also been an event planner and who knows, maybe she will add this to her list of slashes again one day. Her business is called Simply Transformed.

Another friend, Daniel Gargliardi-Paez, is a surfer on the Swiss National Surfing Team, has his own business finishing/shaping and selling surfboards in Switzerland called Force Line Surfboards, Intl., and is a very successful computer specialist the Apple® Team on Bahnhofstrasse in Zurich.

Hats off to other friends, colleagues and (former and present) clients who have slash careers: Mary Yee, Dilek Cansin, Selime Berk, Olivier Pirlot, Kate Pendergrass Norlander, Holger Hendricks, Brian Sparks, Dina Ioannou, Albert Klein, Jeff and Kristen Kidder, Urs Rey, Melissa Kurtcuoglu, so many others, and especially the supposedly “retired” Dr. Prabhu Guptara.

Now for me: besides being a writer/blogger, I am a business coach/ business communications lecturer and a sometime speaker. I am also a mentor and coach/helper of start-ups and artists and other creatives. What pays? Most of it, because I do what energizes me. Besides teaching here are some of the activities (besides teaching, writing and speaking) that have filled my time recently:

  • General business coaching
  • Executive and management coaching
  • Career and job transition coaching (both at beginning and middle management levels)
  • Life and career choices coaching (for young people, but also for those who are making decisions after about 10-15 years of work)
  • Moving into management coaching
  • Expat coaching (intercultural transition and adjustments)
  • Time management coaching
  • Decision-making coaching
  • Conflicts at work coaching
  • Burnout coaching
  • Coaching people with slash careers
  • Start-up business coaching (both regular and creative businesses)
  • Starting a coaching business coaching and mentoring
  • Assisting friends who are artists and creatives
  • Masterminds (a kind of small group coaching)
  • Life Coaching

So, are you a slash? Maybe I can help you manage some of the and highlight the benefits. Even if we don’t work together at the moment, at least you have a new name for what you are doing: you can say “I have a slash career – one person, multiple jobs.” You are not schizophrenic, you are multifaceted!!! Now you have a name for “what you do”: a slash career. Enjoy the variety!

Patricia Jehle www.jehle-coaching.com               patricia@jehle-coaching.com

 

 

 

How we all learn

October 17th, 2017

What are you reading and learning?

Learning takes REFLECTION and CONNECTION

Reflective times

Mondays are a day for me to reflect on the past week, especially when the weekend was somehow included and made it a package, not a bookend. Today, this is one of my tasks: reflect on the past week and learn from it.

Part of last week’s story is not totally mine alone. We went on holiday as a family, so part of the week was very communal. Yet I had some “me time”, too. Thus I also read a lot, and am still digesting what I read.

Maybe you should begin your week with some reflection

What do you do to begin your week? Do you look at your calendar and prepare mentally and physically for the days to come? Do you reflect on the previous week, on what you learned and experienced? Do you try and place all these activities, emotions and relationships into an integrated whole? Today I am doing these very things.

Question your assumptions

A rather important part of how I do my reflection is to look at my assumptions and decide if they are limiting me and if they are true. I thank Nancy Kline and her books, “Time to Think” and “More Time to Think” for the following ideas for you to consider.

Time to Think

So, here goes: What am I assuming that is stopping me (or the business) from moving forward? Do I think the assumption is true? What is true and liberating instead? If I knew that the true and liberating assumption is correct, how would I go forward?

Time to Connect

But learning also means I need to connect- connect the dots and connect with others to share what I am learning. Connecting the dots for me is how I respond to what I am learning. What am I going to do about it? Sometimes it takes me a while to come up with an answer to that question.

Time to share with others

We are relational creatures, made for relationship, so sharing what we have learned is part of the learning process. When we share, it solidifies what we now know, and it also causes us to build stronger relationships with each other.

So, reflect and question your assumptions. Then think, connect the dots and share what you have learned with a friend or two. We will all be the better for it.

I wish you a reflective, productive, and very educational rest of your week!

Patricia Jehle

Remember to take time to reflect – and connect.

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

www.jehle-coaching.com

What to keep and what to give away (when to quit)

May 29th, 2017

The Art of knowing when to keep on going and when to quit.

Maybe you are doing some (business) activity spring-cleaning and you need to think of what you want to keep doing, and what you want to stop doing. For business leaders this question is one to consider periodically, just as the rest of the world considers all their activities whether work-related or those relating to family, friends and hobbies. Here are some ideas on when to continue with something and when to quit.

When is it time to quit and change?

WHEN TO STAY WITH IT:

  • Your idea is great, your strategy is perfect, you are doing the right things AND life is good, or looking good, at least
  • You – and your team – have the right competencies (or are willing to learn them, fast)
  • You are focusing on the most important things, the ONE thing really (always remember that 80/20 principle, -spend time on the activities that help the most)
  • You have a decision-making process already in place to decide if and when change needs to happen, you already do and are willing to change
  • Your systems are workable and they also allow you to focus on your one thing
  • Your income is greater than your expenditures- remember to always keep score of your successes and failures
  • You are still very passionate about your idea and you are moving forward with it

 

WHEN TO GO and TRY SOMETHING ELSE

  • You have been misunderstanding the signs (here’s a most awesome TEDtalk on this: http://www.ted.com/talks/kathryn_schulz_on_being_wrong# )
  • You idea becomes more important than anything else, including other people, especially those close to you. (Are you willing to lose everything to make your idea succeed, and if it still fails, what will you have left?)
  • Your cons now outweigh (even if they don’t outnumber) your pros
  • You can’t answer important questions, like, “Why are you doing this? Why is x, y, or z happening? How did you miss that?”
  • Your short cuts are cutting you and the business short and you are not doing “the job” right
  • You have tried “everything” and it’s just not working
  • The market has changed since starting and the future does not look positive
  • The only things keeping you from quitting is your pride and your fear (This is important!)
  • You have continued financial and other losses with not much change for the future in sight, even with bootstrapping, cutting costs and trying everything you can everywhere you can
  • All that extra work you have done has not made a difference and you still have little or nothing to show for it
  • Your priorities have changed and you have a different view on your idea and your work
  • There are probably other very good reasons, too, that you can think of.

 

Some more points to consider:

Seth Godin wrote abut quitting in The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick) and in it he mentions the difference between a cul-de-sac and a dip, pointing out that when you face a “no way out” situation with a business, it’s time to cut losses and move on to something new.

Make sure you have TIME to choose

Sometimes you just need a break, a refocus and then you can continue, perhaps with only slight changes. If this is possible, it may really help your business idea. Take that time to think, refocus with a coach, mentor, or a mastermind board and then continue moving.

 

WHEN YOU DO QUIT, DON’T TOTALLY GIVE UP: REFOCUS, STRAIGHTEN YOUR SHOULDERS, and MOVE ON TO SOMETHING EVEN BETTER

Mistakes are part of being human, and it is no shame to make them. Remember a failure is not forever and it is (usually) part of your future success. The moment you learn from your mistakes is the moment you are on your way to the next better idea. The moment you accept it isn’t working, admit it and move on, you are already moving in a positive direction.

Remember, quitting the wrong activity enables you to start the right one. Your next idea might just be the perfect one, and if this present one is weighing you down financially, with your time and energy, emotionally, you may not start the next best idea.

A positive attitude of winning, even when you fail, is the key. Be true to yourself and your values and abilities; think positively about yourself even if you fail. Accept and own the quitting and then move on. Be thankful for what you have, what you have learned and remember that the next idea might be your best.

Reboot: take time and think

As Kenny Rogers puts it in his song,

Every gambler knows

That the secret to survivin’

Is knowin’ what to throw away

And knowin’ what to keep

‘Cause every hand’s a winner

And every hand’s a loser…

 

May you “hand” be a great winner. I wish you much success with it!

Your fellow business gambler,

Patricia Jehle

patricia@jehl-coaching.com

www.jehle-coaching.com

Shake it up! Robots, Business Ideas, and Relational Thinking

December 12th, 2016

Going places and Meeting People

The past week or so has seen some interesting developments in my activities. They have to do with Robots, Business Ideas at the FHNW and attending a talk and a book launch of “The Relational Lens” in Geneva.

 

Business ideas: gin and the Internet of Things

I was honored to have been invited to an event called “Business Ideas” at school last Thursday night- sponsored by Swiss Upstart, CTI Entrepreneurs and IFJ AG

 

We were invited to hear about CTI courses (http://www.cti-entrepreneurship.ch/en/ ) and the start-up contests the school supports, of course but also to hear two different stories of very different business ideas and the lessons they have learned on their way as entrepreneurs.

 

One company works as a service company with big data and other web support services. The other company distills and sells its own liquor. Having two such entrepreneurs in the room who had varied experiences and ideas was helpful for those of us in the room: FHNW students, business owners and leaders, and others.

 

BIG DATA

Alterlis is a service company dealing with The Internet of Things. The CEO suggested that start-ups focus on customers and sales and do not for get that, ever. He gave a very good list of what to do when starting up and in what order: idea (meaning and use), name, logo, motivation (of all involved), responsibilities, taxes and legal issues, ethics (for all- clarified), how to deal with numbers and cash (notary and bookkeeping)UT the same VISION). In a fifteen-minute presentation the basics were given clearly.

 

Gin and Vodka from Zürich

Better Taste distills and sells liquor and has done very well since starting up. The group of four started with an idea and worked on a (secret) gin recipe until it was just right. Then they began producing and selling their product, Turicum Gin. It helped that they had contacts into the Zürich night-club scene and that they knew the market as well as the product. All their marketing has been of the boot-strapping kind and yet they are doing quite well, having moved into black figures just after 9 months of production. One of their best marketing methods is sponsoring their own events with their products being available.

 

Personal Robots

Last Tuesday I and a few others spent the afternoon at a plant where personal robots are being designed, developed, and made for use (www.fp-robotics.com ).   That afternoon was a personal dream come true because I have always been a fan of science fiction and I felt like I was inside one of those books I have read.

 

Personal robots can be maids, cooks and butlers, but also medical providers and home health givers. They can be personal assistants of any kind. And they can learn. The recognize faces and voices, and can be run via an app. Wow. I am still digesting all of this. I have friends who could really use this kind of help– and I would like one, myself, one day.

 

The Relational Lens – Book Launch and Seminar

Soon I will be on the train to Geneva to a Relational Thinking Network event. This is what is written about today’s talk: “Launched in London on 24 October 2016, ‘The Relational Lens: Understanding, measuring and managing stakeholder relationships’ will be introduced by Dr. Michael Schluter, CBE, the founder of the Relational Thinking Network and one of the book’s co-authors. The Relational Lens explores the crucial role of relationships in social capital, risk management, value creation and competitive advantage. It describes the Relational Proximity framework® – an analytic tool which has been used in a variety of contexts to understand, measure, strengthen and repair relationships, positively influencing outcomes.” Of course, I expect I will buy that book.

 

And you?

What are you doing this week or month to shake up your life and to think outside of your box? Look around and you will find some thing(s), I am sure. Have a successful week!

 

Patricia Jehle

 

Should you want to visit my site: www.jehle-coaching.com –Or join my group on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7041402 write me at:

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

8 start-up suggestions

October 17th, 2016

Starting a company: 8 suggestions and some Questions

  1. Begin only if you are passionate about your idea

You have to be more passionate about your idea than about earning money with it, otherwise you will not last the first few years of little or no growth. A client of mine is waiting for his website to go on-line so he can start and it’s already been six months of waiting for him. But he is passionate about his idea(s) and he will go the distance if he continues in the way he ha begun.

2. Check your idea for viability, for feasibility, for financial growth and tweak accordingly

Is there a market for this idea/product? Will it generate enough income at a price that is reasonable for the target niche? Is the niche big enough to support your product idea in the long term, or is this a fad, which you will have to tweak or even give up in a year or two. Remember it may take up to two years to generate “real” money.

ALSO:  Do you plan to do this full-time? If so, how will you live until you start earning money. In other words, what is your budget and financial plan?

  1. Let others help you, and take advice; but leave naysayers out of the picture, at least until you have earned your first million-

You will have lots of people trying to tell you what to do and eventually some will give you wise advice. Ask for advice, but from those who are doing something like this- either on a small, or on a big scale. Ask for mentors from people who, as Brené Brown says, are “in that arena” too.

  1. Get a coach

For most cases, you will need an independent, non-involved party that will ask you good questions (and that is what coaches do, ask questions so you can reflect on your choices and decisions).  You will need this kind of help; trust me.

  1. Build in time for recreation every day and every week and every quarter, because burnout is easy to catch-

Burnout may even be the reason for you starting your own enterprise. The temptation is to focus so much on your idea that you don’t think about yourself, your key relationships and then you start to suffer. Build in time for self-care, for a healthy physical and relational life and your start-up will last past the beginning stages.

  1. Don’t give up; in fact, have a plan for if you feel like giving up-

Ask yourself, when things get tough, what am I going to do. Ask, when I am running out of money to grow, what will I do. Ask when I am tired and don’t feel like I can go on, what am I going to do.

Remember:

And then remember those first days and the passion. Remember the joy of starting and of that first sale. Remember the advice you have received from good mentors. Then take a (short) break, tweak, and carry one! Don’t give up!

 

  1. When it is time, on-board a team, first an outsourced on, and when ready, a salaried team

It could be that your idea is a solo-preneur idea, but you are going to need people to call on for support and help, people you can also recommend to others when they need help: a web-person, an accountant (or at least software), possibly a lawyer, people who do things that help your business and are not in direct competition with you. For example, a client who is an interior designer, may want someone specializing in furniture building or interior sewing to be on the team.

Eventually, if your company is meant to have employees, you need to pick them well. Depending on if you have a partner or not, depends on the company structure. For example, one partner is the CEO and the other the CFO. I have seen this particular situation relatively often. If you are alone, one of the first people to on-board should be a CFO-type person. Money is not everything, but in a company, it is very important to watch all the numbers. Then there are the marketing and sales types, the technology types (both for running and for growth-development, depending on the kind of idea you have), logistics/operations, and strategy. In the beginning, people may wear quite a few hats, but as your company grows, the person will, hopefully have fewer and be able to focus on their strengths.

Allow your team to help you grow your company

Leadership is key and so is delegation and respect. You need to create a culture of positive growth and listening to you main team’s ideas and suggestions. Remember, if you want to grow you will need help. Let your team do that for you!

 

  1. Dream big. Think about the future of your company and your life-

Once you are on your way, you should continue to dream. What are your three, five, ten-year plans? What is next? And after that? This might be where a coach comes in, again, to help you broaden your horizons. Finally, here are a few more questions for you to chew on:

Is your idea reproducible? Franchise-able? What does the long term look like?

Do you plan to sell your company? If so, when?

–I wish you much success!

This is the preface to my upcoming book: “Swiss start-up: What do you need to know and do.” Look for it soon!

 — and should you want to visit my site: www.jehle-coaching.com –Or join my group on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7041402

Patricia Jehle

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

Unknown

 

 

 

 

What works? Grow your business, part 2

September 26th, 2016

Get clients and customers: What works!?!

Are you overbooked, yet?

I read Michael Mayer’s Seven Levels of Communication a wile ago and took his book to heart. Because of this ideas, I have almost more business than I can handle at the moment. So, what’s his premise?

Relationships are key. Authenticity and a great product are what matters.

I like that because that is how I work: relational and I am a person that honors my word. How about you? Are you curious about how this seven levels idea works?

Well, first, leave those big expensive advertising campaigns and direct mails to the rich guys who can waste their money. The return on investment for these activities is very small. Emails and other electronic communication is, at least, free. But electronic communication may not get you much further, either — so then what to do?

Do these:

Write a handwritten note, make a call, go to a meeting or an event where you meet someone, and have one-to-one meetings with your potential clients. It’s all abut relationship.

Relationships is what works.

Leave the direct mailing, advertising and electronic communication to giving out information about you and your product. That’s all. The way to becoming overbooked lies in relationship: meet people, write to people (by hand with stamped envelopes), and call people. Finally, set up one-to-one meetings and talk to the people face to face.

Where do you go to meet people?

Networking is key and yet, not all networking events are equal. I have written about this a few times, but it bears repeating. So, make a plan: go to what interests you and to where you might meet people that would (eventually) interest you. But go with the point of having fun, not “doing business”. Go to meet and, especially, to help others.  When you have these goals in mind, you will have a great time and meet new friends.

Who do you write to?

You need to target people who fit with your product and your ethos. Those are the people you write to. Do spend care on the writing process and do be honest about your intentions. Remember: integrity and relationship. When you write them, tell them you are going to call. Then follow through.

Who do you call?

The people you call are the potential clients that you hope to meet on a one-to-one basis. You have told them you are going to call and now you spend a little time (half an hour or even less) finding out if they and you fit together. There is no need to have a “spiel”, as your wonderful product should be what you offer with your best “you” backing it up. Remember, you are to be your authentic self and remember to smile. That smile can be heard over the phone.

Who to meet with on a one-to-one basis?

Those people have made it “past” the telephone stage and they are the people with whom you want to establish a business relationship. They should fit with your product, with your ethos, with you. Remember to have a call to action ready for them at the end of the meeting and remember to ask for action. Do not be shy. These people have taken the time to meet and listen to you in person so they are interested in you and you product. Go for it! Then, if they say yes, great. But what if they say “not now” or “no”?

If they say not now, ask when you should get back to them (and then do it). Keep track of those people very carefully.

If they say no, ask why and also what might make their mind change. Remember a no may be a not now, too, so be careful to make sure.

With this process practice and carried out you will be on your way to reaching your goals. But remember to be yourself and to have a great product.

seven-levels-of-communication-class-presentation-7-638

Enjoy your company growth, and should you want to visit my site: www.jehle-coaching.com –Or join my group on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7041402

Have a great rest of the week!

Patricia Jehle

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

 

 

To err and learn from it

June 15th, 2016

Do you get smarter from your failures?

 

Fear of Failure?

I live in a fear-of-failure culture. It is hard for people around me to make, admit and accept failures. But we must make failures, after all, we are human.

 

I heard a wonderful talk on making (and learning from) mistakes by Dr. Theo Wehner of the ETH in Zürich a week ago and it has made me consider making mistakes again.

Perception is everything

It really depends on how we look at things- our perception of the failure is key- Thomas Edison said this of his some 9,000 mistakes before making a light bulb: “I know several thousand things that won’t work!” thus, he kept learning—and kept trying. Look what happened to him.

 

To err is human

We all make mistakes of several kinds under two main categories, deliberate and inadvertent:

 

Deliberate (non-compliance): routine, situational and exceptional

Inadvertent (error): Action (slip or lapse) and Thinking (rule or knowledge-based)

 

Reflect on the mistakes to learn from them

The question is why we made the mistakes. We must reflect upon them and learn from them. If we stuff our feelings about them or deny those mistakes, we cannot learn from them.

 

So, what should we do?

 

  • We need to get curious about those mistakes
  • We need to (perhaps) be coached regarding our mistakes
  • We need to deal with our emotions about the mistakes we make
  • We need to create working and living cultures where mistakes are okay and we can thus learn from them

 

Maybe starting from the last sentence would be best. I said that I live in a fear-of-failure culture. We have to begin there and remember that that very aspect of making mistakes and feeling something (like remorse) is what makes us human.

 

Think in Group Think

Perhaps our overly individual culture is part of the problem. Centuries ago we would have thought much more in a communal fashion, so much so that an individual could not have “failed” and a family or community would have failed together. If we took more responsibility for each others’ mistakes, we might learn more readily from mistakes.

 

Feel the Pain

We need to admit the emotions we feel when we fail and reflect on them, work through them, not ignore them or pretend they are not there. We need to let ourselves feel that pain.

 

Maybe we need coaching

Perhaps a non-involved party can help you work through the mistake and learn from it. When someone from outside of the problem comes along and helps you see the issue for what it is, it becomes smaller and more easily solved or – when completed – not something you need to repeat. After all, that is one of the big goals: to learn so as not to make the same mistake over and over again. Reflection is very important and a coach can help with that.

 

No denying, instead- be curious

But most of all, we need to become much more curious

In this case, curiosity will not kill the proverbial cat, but will allow you to get on with life and work. When we start to take a serious look at our mistake, we can learn from them and not fall into the trap of repeating the mistakes again.

 

Patricia Jehle

www.jehle-coacing.com

 

for more info:

 

https://hbr.org/2011/04/strategies-for-learning-from-failure

https://student.societyforscience.org/article/really-learn-fail-—-then-fail-again

http://www.hse.gov.uk/humanfactors/topics/types.pdf

 

 

swisscheesemodel

Happy New Year! What’s new?

January 5th, 2016

Happy 2016! My wish for you is that you have MORE of what really counts in this coming year!

 new-year-main

I am really excited about what is happening and what I will be involved in in the upcoming months. What’s on your plate? Here is what’s on mine:

 

A look at my first semester of 2016, through June, and what I am looking forward to:

 

New Alpha Groups starting in Zürich and Baden/Brugg: To say that I am thrilled about the new groups and their businesses is a real understatement. I am so pleased to help their companies grow in a REAL and effective way. January 14th is the BIG day for the Zürich group! http://www.jehle-coaching.com/aboutthealphagroup.html

 

New Clients

I have always tried to “graduate” clients- it is the idea when one coaches for solutions: the clients should come and go- so at this moment, some are going, and some are coming. Each person is such a pleasure to coach and to see the change in their lives.

 

ETAS Conference: I still love teaching (see below) and that means I keep up with my (local) professional group. https://www.e-tas.ch/events/conferences-agms/32nd-annual-conference-and-agm-2016

 

New semester of teaching Business Communication: This semester it is teaching introduction to business communication and teaching negotiation, four classes, in all. http://www.fhnw.ch/wirtschaft

 

A wedding: There could be more than one coming up, but one is confirmed. I love weddings, the fun, the potential for life, and the joy. I can hardly wait!

 

A leadership conference and a writers’ conference in one weekend: never say I lead a dull life! I still enjoy writing- A LOT!

 

Teaching a Coaching (for coaches to coach expat start-ups) Workshop: This short course is for potential coaches and those coaches who are looking into either expat start-up coaching or start-up coaching, in general. This course dovetails nicely with The Alpha Groups. http://www.fhnw.ch/sozialearbeit/weiterbildung/angebote/kursdetails/?id=9176411&hsurl=sozialearbeit

 

Coaching Meets Research Conference: I went two years ago and went away challenged and energized, so I expect no less from this year. http://www.coaching-meets-research.ch/kongress-2016/programm-1/programm

 

So, my life has a bit more in it this year. What more would you like to do? Sometime in July I will turn down the burner for a few weeks and think a lot, and all the previous work will balance the time of reflection and rest.Unknown

Christmas Greetings for 2015!

December 14th, 2015

DSCN5553

The time of annual Christmas letters and cards is upon us. I haven’t quite figured out how much to put in this blog, as the family prefers to remain anonymous, and quite understandably so. This year has had its ups and downs, as I am sure most of you have had, too.

 

+My own business

To focus on the ups for a moment, I have started a legally registered business in Switzerland. This is a rather big deal for me, as I did it all by myself with no help from consultants, or the government. I am quite proud of my accomplishment, and feel that it is also helpful for my clients and future clients, since I have walked the same road as they have.

 

+More training and new horizons

I also underwent more training with Nobel Manhattan so I am a certified Regional Director of The Alpha Group (.biz). We are starting board meetings in the New Year and I am quite excited about the whole endeavor. The prospect of helping SMEs double their business is exciting, but it also supports the local economy in ways that multinationals cannot.

 

+I am still writing

I haven’t stopped and, although one project is on ice for the moment, a second is still going (60,000 words and counting), and I do like writing these blogs, too!

 

+I still love teaching business communications

It’s amazing that I have stayed with one job so long and that means something: I love it! This year has been no different and I look forward to next semester, and the following school year with great anticipation.

 

+I am teaching a short two-day course on coaching to expats

The course is to look at expat start-ups in Switzerland (and elsewhere) and how to coach those brave people. This is an exciting new adventure for me!

 

Yet not everything is easy

But there have been hard times, as well.

 

Some of my regular readers know that some dear neighbors have passed away this year, as has my mother, just last month. The grief continues to work its way out with me, as it does with the spouses and loved ones of my neighbors. I saw a really perfect visual on the grieving process recently and I think it is correct to say that the feelings of loss and sadness do not go away completely, but the times of happiness return and we experience both the happy and sad. Sometimes the sadness is still like a sharp pain, but other times, I am able to remember all the fun times together without that pain. My mom and I had many great times together, after all.

 

Finally, I look forward to this holiday season, where I can step back, take a breath, reflect on the good and the hard, and anticipate a great 2016 to come!

May you and yours be blessed this season and throughout 2016!

patricia Jehle patricia@jehle-coaching.com

www.jehle-coaching.com