Posts Tagged ‘change management’

Reinvent yourself for Success!

March 20th, 2018

Re-inventing Yourself – a necessity for many, especially for those over 50, but it’s vital for others, too.

 

For many people facing job-cuts and company reorganization, reinvention is key for continuing in the work force.  Unemployment is the catalyst for many changes.

It just may not be possible, especially if you are at the top, to  do exactly what you have been doing at same level of seniority (and pay, at least in Switzerland).

You will have to reinvent yourself.  This kind of change is possible, but also can be difficult.

Yes, we ALL can change

Based on research, I believe every person is able to change until their life on this earth ends.  So, my answer would be a qualified yes.  I will tell you a story about myself that illustrates this qualified yes.

An example from my teenage years

When I was about 14 years old I was a typically shy teen: bookish, reserved, pretty good at school and pretty uninterested in (most) sports.  But I wanted to be more “popular”, to “have more fun” the way I saw others enjoying themselves.  So, for a while I observed those who I considered more popular that were having fun, and thought about what they did differently than I.  I came to a simple conclusion:

They put themselves forward and volunteered more, for one thing.  They offered to do things.

So, as of that day of realization I began to volunteer to do things for others, starting with easy things and then gradually getting bolder so that, now at this point some five decades later, I volunteer to do the hard things, like pitching at startup weekends (last weekend).

This change simply began by raising my hand and offering my opinion, my time, my voice, my energy, and my creativity.  It actually began at a youth camp with my offering to organize a skit for everyone to watch and playing the “lead speaking” role in it.  Each little success led to another trial of something a little bit harder.

But not every attempt was successful.  Some of them were, of course, failures. Yet, when I tell most people who know me socially that I am an introvert, they are surprised because I have learned to act extroverted, I have learned to put myself forward and the risk involved has become less difficult for me.

I really do enjoy parties and being with people nowadays, but I still love time alone and books more. It took time to learn how to deal with the energy output, to coach myself on how to “do” these kinds of relatively unnatural activities.

The qualification to the “yes, you can”

You can re-invent yourself with a qualified yes.  We all have our general personality traits and we work from a starting point of where we are at.  Yet, we need to challenge ourselves and not use the excuse, “I am introverted and can’t do parties or “I am extroverted and can’t work/be alone.”

We are all able to do a lot of activities we don’t think we can, if we try and learn and try again, and keep trying until we make it.  But those activities may very well be out of our “normal arena of comfort”.  These new activities may drain us more than other more typical to our personality activities do.

Change is hard.  Change will not be easy for you, that is true, but if you want to keep working after being made redundant (especially after he age of 50 in Switzerland), change will be necessary for your success.

Re-inventing your career

When dealing with joblessness over 50, it is vital to re-invent your career, instead of working only within ones’ experience, training and/or personality borders, you will need a “Career Swing” of some sort.  Lately this topic has become more important for my friends and colleagues as the business and the economic reality of Switzerland’s landscape has been changing.

Essentially what the issue is, is that you need a good change process plan, based on the environment, your (realistic) expectations, and your abilities and boundaries.

You may change your type of work, the way you work (perhaps as a consultant), or maybe you will start your own business.  This will, then start even more change processes.  Of course, you may have to learn new things such as more about networking and using social media, too.

And what about your business, if you have one?

Finally, sometimes you need to re-invent or re-vamp your business or business strategies.  This kind of inventory taking for business should be done quarterly or twice a year at the least —depending on the business results from the last quarter and/or semester.

I would love to have an email (or otherwise, perhaps a Skype or coffee) dialog about this kind of re-invention.  Maybe you are anticipating a big change, or are in the middle of it.  No matter what, though, when dealing with this difficult change process, remember to start by asking yourself what works for others, what has worked for you in the past, and what might work in the future, based on the present situation.

You will then be on your way to a different future, and maybe even in a different place!

Have a great rest of the week!

Patricia Jehle                    patricia@jehle-coaching.com and www.jehle-coaching.com 

Also, should you be interested in joining my LinkedIn Group, SMEs Grow Together, go here: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7041402  or like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Jehle.Coaching/

Get out of your own way!

October 24th, 2017

Business not going well? You have all your ducks in a row, but something seems to be stopping you? Is something intangible slowing down your business? Maybe you have inner conflicts with yourself that need addressing so you can start moving forward again.

This past week I read a wonderful book by negotiation expert Professor Dr. William Ury of Harvard Business School called Getting to Yes with Yourself and I found some treasures to help us out of those stuck places in business and in life.

Get out of Your Own Way

Here’s Ury’s 6-Step Model:

  1. Put yourself in your shoes
  2. Develop your inner BATNA
  3. Reframe your picture
  4. Stay in the Zone
  5. Respect them, even if
  6. Give and Receive

What this means, step-by-step:

  • Put yourself in your own shoes means you need to understand your own feelings and needs before you can go anywhere near the business negotiation/ the other person you are dealing with. Ask yourself questions regarding your feelings and your deepest needs.
  • Develop your inner BATNA refers to the famous Fisher/Ury negotiation concept Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement- what are you going to do if the deal doesn’t work out? In other words for yourself, take care of the deepest needs you have in this (and every) situation, no matter what happens. You are not a victim, take responsibility for your own needs.
  • Reframe your picture is about how you see the world, and even the universe. See it as working for your and “the” good, and you will not live in the trap of scarcity. Remember, scarcity leads to decisions made out of fear, which is to be avoided. Take decisions from a place of trust and abundance instead.
  • Stay in the Zone refers to being in the present, not focusing on the past or future. It means letting go of the past and its problems and freeing yourself from anxiety about the future. Staying in the zone allows you to succeed. Hanging on to past regrets and hurts or worrying about tomorrow are not going to help in any way, and in fact, they hinder you from moving forward. Avoid all those “should” statements. That show you are either judging yourself or someone else, instead ask yourself, “what is the smallest thing I (or someone else) can do now to make a change?”
  • Respect them even if is about how we treat each person with the respect due every human being. I don’t have to approve of the persons actions or beliefs. I don’t need to like the person. I just need to make a decision to treat the person with respect. I also can try and understand the person by “walking in their shoes” and trying to see the issue from their experiences and background.
  • Give and Receive means that the most successful business people are givers and not takers, and that is according to research (Wharton Business School).

When you understand this concept you are very likely to become unstuck and move forward in business, in negotiation, and in life. There are good questions I as a coach can ask you about each step in Ury’s model to help you along your way to success.

Remember to get to yes with yourself and you are more likely to move forward in business and in life.

Have a successful week!

Patricia Jehle

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

www.jehle-coaching.com

Podcasts and Penguins

October 3rd, 2017

CHANGE and Penguins

What have you been thinking about? I have been thinking about change, a book about penguins and my podcast to help some people implement change in their organization has just gone live.

The reason I am thinking about change partially has to do with what I am teaching this semester at university. I am using the book “Our Iceberg is Melting” by Dr. John Kotter in one of my classes. It’s not (really) about global warming, but instead about change management. It’s a fable showing how you get an organization to enact change well.

 

The first step is to get your leaders, movers and shakers (influencers) on board and to do that you communicate the great urgent need for the change- the BIG WHY. And your urgent need has to scare people a little- to a penguin a melting iceberg is a very scary situation, indeed.

 

You need a majority to be on board with the change. Mr. Kotter says you should have at least 50% of an organization on board with the change, and it would be better to have about 75% in full agreement. That’s a lot of people! Thus, your communication of the NEED is really the key to the whole change process.

After that it’s all about communication, organization, planning and seeing the change completely through. This process is nothing to take lightly. Change must be managed well and thoroughly for it to succeed.

 

Here are the steps:

  • See and communicate the need
  • Decide and Prepare (plan!)
  • Manage the change
  • Reinforce the change

 

The other reason I am thinking about change is that my third podcast on the topic of change and decision making is now up and running and should you be interested, it gives a more in-depth look into the change process than this blog does. https://qt4cm.org/037-make-decision-regarding-major-change-ministry-part-3/

 

May you have a lovely rest of the week!

Patricia Jehle patricia@jehle-coaching.com         www.jehle-coaching.com

 

Change is good and change is hard

August 28th, 2017

CHANGE! Where are we and where do we want to go?

I am thinking about change this week, and working on a podcast to help some people implement change in their organization, so I will let my readers see a little into my ideas and thoughts.

Which changes and how?

  • change is good
  • change is hard
  • change is natural and normal, we all change; life is about change
  • change goes against the status quo and takes a lot of energy to bring about
  • change brings innovation and new energy
  • change gets stuck somewhere, usually

 

I believe all these and many more statements to be true about change. Change in an organization can be hard but it is necessary for continued innovation and sustained growth and life. Thus I have written up some steps and ideas to help bring about change within an organization, based on Dr. John Kotter’s seven steps.

Here are some steps to change with a few questions

SEE THE NEED

  • See need and increase urgency
  • Choose your change team and find your first movers/influencers (from a large group of people across the organization at all levels)

Some Questions:

  • Do you see a Big Opportunity that could ignite the hearts and minds of your people?
  • Do you know how to identify, articulate and communicate it?
  • Are you able to connect an external change factor with a special capability of your organization?
  • What are the stakes if you succeed? Consequences if you fail?
  • Can you get at least 50% of your organization to buy in to the change?
  • How will you find a way to engage a formalized network to take on the change initiative?
  • How can this new change be seen as a “want to” and not a “have to”?

AND

  • How might current hierarchical and silo-based structures stop communication and engagement (especially regarding change)?
  • Where in your organization are people aligned around a single idea that inspires them to do things that move ideas forward?
  • Do people within the organization speak about the goals in the same way with the same priority? If not, how can these be aligned?
  • If you asked people around the organization about the Change Vision, how many different answers would you get?

DECIDE & PREPARE

  • Focus- define your vision foundation and values and choose your outcomes
  • Assess- conduct a change readiness assessment and assess where you are at the moment in terms of the chosen outcomes
  • Plan- (get and involve a coach specializing in change management)establish a change leadership team
  • What needs to be in your strategy?
  1. A vision with measurable objectives that are simple to communicate
  2. Think S.M.A.R.T. (look this up if you don’t know about it)
  3. Make a step-by step plan
  4. Involve your first movers/leaders in this planning stage so they are on the same page with you—you will need people from different areas/departments so the seeds can be sown throughout the organization
  • Spread the message- inform your first movers, make concrete change management plans, build organizational support through communication of need and plan
  1. Within and without the organization, but first within!
  2. Remove any expected barriers or resistant systems before making the change
  3. Make sure anything undermining the vision is gotten rid of

MANAGE

  • Enable and empower action- make sure the ones who bring change (leaders, first movers) have the power to implement the change
  • Train- initiate training and coaching of the change agents
  • Communicate- clearly communicate expectations for all involved across the whole organization, including addressing anticipated resistance
  • Implement- mobilize the (change) teams and execute the plans

REINFORCE

  • Celebrate- celebrate all, even small, successes
  • Sustain- remember to add energy after the honeymoon stage where change often gets bogged down, don’t stop until it is finished and totally refined
  • Refine – assess progress and see where to change the process and plans
  • Adapt- identify improvement areas via continued checks and feedback
  • Continue to communicate-
  1. Go public with your change(s)- share with all donors and other key stakeholders outside of your organization
  2. Show the public where you are and where you want to go and the way you plan to get there: articulate a clear vision for everyone
  3. Repeat your vision until it becomes know, up to 12 months

Change is hard

Adapted from: http://go.kotterinternational.com/rs/819-HHR-571/images/8%20Steps%20for%20Accelerating%20Change%20eBook.pdf

 

Organic Quality Management and Relationships

January 10th, 2017

This past week I participated in a training course on Organic Quality Management (OQM®) Consulting. It was a stimulating time and I was given a new tool with which to continue to move forward. One part of the tool regards the Quality Characteristics of a healthy company (or team). And they are listed below:

What does your company (or team) look like regarding the 8 OQM® qualitative characteristics?

  • Leadership
  • Workers
  • Vision
  • Structures
  • Values
  • Teams
  • Service
  • Relationship

More Thoughts Regarding Relationships

Then this past month I have been processing two books from Relational Thinking: The Relational Lens and the Relational Manager. They add to OQM® with regards to qualitative characteristics in the area of relationship. Relationships on a team and in the company as a whole can make or break your success.

Specifically, what are the positives and negatives regarding the relationships on your team or in your company?

Here are the 5 Relational Analytics Areas

  • Directness
  • Continuity
  • Multi-plexity
  • Parity
  • Commonality

 

Let’s look at teams for now regarding these five areas and ask some good questions:

Directness – How much face-to-face time do people have with each other? How is that time used? How can it better be used (especially to create better relationships)?

Continuity – How much turnover is there on the team? How might/does that affect relationships (especially with regards to group dynamics)? How can the team have more stability to create a common storyline together and give the team a better sense of momentum?

Multi-plexity – How is information gained on the team? How can the breadth of shared knowledge be broadened so that team members can respond to change together?

Parity – How is the use of power affecting the team? How are fairness and participation promoted on the team so that mutual respect is a shared value?

Commonality – How can we see that the team shares the same vision, purpose and values? How does that add to – or subtract from ­– the sense of synergy and unity of the group?

And if you are the Manager of this team, how are you going to support each of the five areas?

So, what does this have to do with me? I am seriously considering becoming a licensed OQM® Consultant and so you can contact me and talk to me about all 8 quality characteristics, about how OQM® works, and how to better your team and your company with the analysis and change processes based on your personal company analysis.

If you are not interested, the above questions are still very helpful to reflect upon.

Happy 2017 to you!

Patricia Jehle

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

 

Change and you

August 5th, 2016

Change Happens

 

Change, like another entity that goes with the word “happen”, happens. We as human beings are affected by change on a daily basis. As someone who has been working for nearly three decades, I have seen a lot of change, both in my chosen industry and in the world itself, especially the technical world.

 

As a personal example regarding technical changes, here are some examples: I wrote my bachelor’s honors thesis on the college’s mainframe word processing system, which took learning a whole new computer language just for that one paper. My master’s thesis was written on my old manual typewriter that skipped spaces if you backspaced to correct mistakes. Then I had a commodore computer in the 90s and after that one of those funky green iMacs a few years later, now I have a MacbookPro, after two other Macbooks… As a teacher I began making copies with a mimeograph (google this, if you want) for several years and then I eventually moved to photocopying some time around the year 2000. At the present moment when I lecture at the university I have a desk that has a camera on it –and there is no overhead projector to be found at the university where I teach. The students download the appropriate papers to their computers and other devices for study. We are become much more paperless these days.

 

Each technical change I have experienced over the years has not been easy for me, but to remain part of the mainstream of my profession I have needed to move on, I have needed to embrace the new ideas and then learn how to use those new ideas to develop the skills required to carry out and make the changes and then finally I have then had to make plans for further positive change. Change is on-going. It is fluid. It happens, with, or without, my approval.

 

Nobody likes to change

 

The reason I am thinking about change today is because as a coach, I have been working with CEOs and owners a lot and change is one of THE topics for them.

 

My friend said one weekend, “nobody wants to change”. He is pretty much right, but does that mean we, as business leaders, don’t talk about change, or do we find a way to engage in thinking positively about change? According to Kotter’s 8-step model of change (see the photo with the books), one of the first things that needs to be done is to establish some sort of sense of urgency, a need for the change. Let’s put this thought for the moment aside and consider when to change.

 

When is the best time to effect change? Now, and always!

 

Much energy is expended in order to bring about change. In fact, the energy expended for any change can be seen as a bell curve, but the problem lies in the fact that if you want to bring about a change without expending a whole lot of energy, you need to change while you are still expending energy from the last change. Thus, it is best to start the change-ball in motion and just keep it going rather than starting and stopping all the time. Now, that’s a challenging idea!

 

Create Urgency: Get them on board

 

The other issue is on-boarding the team(s). How do you get the people who will be effecting the change behind the idea? That is where your personal leadership style comes into play. I have seen change processes that were well explained with logical reasoning, starting with the urgent need. Those changes went well, considering everything. But I have seen others that were not “sold” as urgent to the employees, and the change management was not well carried-out.

 

A well thought out reasoning for the change that is clearly communicated to the stakeholders brings the majority of the team on board so that the change can be well executed. But part of it is magic. The magic happens outside our comfort zones. We ourselves want to learn and become better, but to do that we have to start (and keep) moving – out of our personal and professional comfort zones.

change-books

This particular blog is re-worked from May, 2015. I thought it needed re-doing, and especially repeating.

Have a great weekend!

Patricia Jehle

www.jehle-coaching.com

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

To err and learn from it

June 15th, 2016

Do you get smarter from your failures?

 

Fear of Failure?

I live in a fear-of-failure culture. It is hard for people around me to make, admit and accept failures. But we must make failures, after all, we are human.

 

I heard a wonderful talk on making (and learning from) mistakes by Dr. Theo Wehner of the ETH in Zürich a week ago and it has made me consider making mistakes again.

Perception is everything

It really depends on how we look at things- our perception of the failure is key- Thomas Edison said this of his some 9,000 mistakes before making a light bulb: “I know several thousand things that won’t work!” thus, he kept learning—and kept trying. Look what happened to him.

 

To err is human

We all make mistakes of several kinds under two main categories, deliberate and inadvertent:

 

Deliberate (non-compliance): routine, situational and exceptional

Inadvertent (error): Action (slip or lapse) and Thinking (rule or knowledge-based)

 

Reflect on the mistakes to learn from them

The question is why we made the mistakes. We must reflect upon them and learn from them. If we stuff our feelings about them or deny those mistakes, we cannot learn from them.

 

So, what should we do?

 

  • We need to get curious about those mistakes
  • We need to (perhaps) be coached regarding our mistakes
  • We need to deal with our emotions about the mistakes we make
  • We need to create working and living cultures where mistakes are okay and we can thus learn from them

 

Maybe starting from the last sentence would be best. I said that I live in a fear-of-failure culture. We have to begin there and remember that that very aspect of making mistakes and feeling something (like remorse) is what makes us human.

 

Think in Group Think

Perhaps our overly individual culture is part of the problem. Centuries ago we would have thought much more in a communal fashion, so much so that an individual could not have “failed” and a family or community would have failed together. If we took more responsibility for each others’ mistakes, we might learn more readily from mistakes.

 

Feel the Pain

We need to admit the emotions we feel when we fail and reflect on them, work through them, not ignore them or pretend they are not there. We need to let ourselves feel that pain.

 

Maybe we need coaching

Perhaps a non-involved party can help you work through the mistake and learn from it. When someone from outside of the problem comes along and helps you see the issue for what it is, it becomes smaller and more easily solved or – when completed – not something you need to repeat. After all, that is one of the big goals: to learn so as not to make the same mistake over and over again. Reflection is very important and a coach can help with that.

 

No denying, instead- be curious

But most of all, we need to become much more curious

In this case, curiosity will not kill the proverbial cat, but will allow you to get on with life and work. When we start to take a serious look at our mistake, we can learn from them and not fall into the trap of repeating the mistakes again.

 

Patricia Jehle

www.jehle-coacing.com

 

for more info:

 

https://hbr.org/2011/04/strategies-for-learning-from-failure

https://student.societyforscience.org/article/really-learn-fail-—-then-fail-again

http://www.hse.gov.uk/humanfactors/topics/types.pdf

 

 

swisscheesemodel

ReInvent Yourself?

May 3rd, 2016

Re-inventing Yourself – a Myth or Reality?

 

I have recently read a couple of articles that said you could (or couldn’t) re-invent yourself. Well, that is a good question. Can you re-invent yourself and if yes, to what extent and how?

 

Yes, we all can change

Based on research, I believe every person is able to change until their life on this earth ends. So, my answer would be a qualified yes. I will tell you a story about myself that illustrates this qualified yes.

 

An example from my teenage years

When I was about 14 years old I was a typical shy teen: bookish, reserved, pretty good at school and pretty uninterested in (most) sports. But I wanted to be more popular, to “have more fun” in a way that I considered fun. So, for a while I observed those who I considered more popular and fun, and thought about what they did differently than I. I came to a conclusion:

 

They put themselves forward and volunteered more, for one thing. They offered to do things.

 

So, as of the day of that realization I began to volunteer to do things, starting with easy things and then gradually getting bolder so that, now at this point some five decades later, I volunteer to do the hard things. This change simply began with raising my hand and beginning to offer my opinion, my time, my voice, my energy, and my creativity. It actually began at a youth camp with my offering to organize a skit for everyone to watch and playing the “lead speaking” role in it. Each little success led to another trial of something a little bit harder.

 

Failure and the “qualified yes”

But not everything was easily successful. Something of those trials were, of course, failures. I remember singing a solo in front of a similar (supportive-ish) crowd. But it was a fail, and so now I sing in groups, not alone, as I do not want to hurt my more musically sensitive friends’ ears.

 

Those are simple examples, but I want to come back to the fact I was shy and bookish. I am still an introvert who prefers books to big parties. When I tell most people who know me socially that I am an introvert, they are surprised because I have learned to act extroverted to a certain extent, I have learned to put myself forward and the risk involved is not too hard for me to overcome anymore.

 

I really do enjoy parties and being with people nowadays, but I love time alone and books more. It took time to learn how to deal with the energy output, to coach myself on how to “do” these kinds of relatively unnatural activities.

 

The qualification

That is why I say that you can re-invent yourself with a qualified yes. We all have our general personality traits and we work from a starting point of where we are at at any given point in time. Yet, we need to challenge ourselves and not use the excuse, “I am introverted and can’t do parties or “I am extroverted and can’t work/be alone.” We are all able to do a lot of activities we don’t think we can, if we try and learn and try again, and keep trying until we make it. But those activities may very well be out of our “normal arena of comfort”. They may drain us more than other more typical to our personality activities do. That, issue, is another blog topic, however.

 

Re-inventing your career

Sometimes it is necessary to re-invent a career, instead of working on ones’ personality borders. Lately this topic has become more important for my friends and colleagues as the business and the economic reality of Switzerland’s landscape has been changing. Here is an excellent article from Forbes on re-inventing one’s career: http://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2016/04/25/5-essential-tips-to-reinvent-your-career/?utm_campaign=Forbes&utm_source=linkedin%20company&utm_medium=social&utm_channel=Investing&linkId=24031409#535207013e30

Essentially what the author, Robert DiGiacomo, is saying is that you need a good plan based on the environment, your expectations, and your abilities and boundaries. He also gives some specific advice regarding networking and using social media, which could even be helpful for those of us who are not so interested in re-inventing anything at the moment. All-in-all, this short article is well worth the few minutes to read it.

 

And what about your business?

Finally, sometimes you need to re-invent or re-vamp your business strategies. This kind of inventory taking for business should be done quarterly—depending on the business results from the last quarter and/or semester. One of the best TED talks I have recently see is on the balance between exploration and exploitation, which can be seen here: Two reasons companies fail — and how to avoid them

 

 

I would love to have an email (or otherwise, perhaps a Skype or coffee) dialog about this kind of re-invention. No matter what, though, when at the beginning of this process, remember to ask yourself what works for others, what has worked for you in the past, and what might work in the future. You will then be on your way to a different situation, future, and maybe even place!

 

Patricia Jehle                    patricia@jehle-coaching.com and www.jehle-coaching.com

 

 

ps, For those of you who want to know about The Alpha Group and how that could help bring your business more value and sales, please sign up for an email here: http://eepurl.com/b0hyEb

 

Also, should you be interested in joining my LinkedIn Group, SMEs Grow Together, go here: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7041402change-books

There’s Magic in the Mess

March 29th, 2016

6a00d83451d48a69e201676686aa03970b

Questions to help with the “MESSY MIDDLE”

 

Sometimes we are way too impatient with ourselves – and others – and expect to set a goal and reach it easily, in record time.

 

But, in any real situation, unless that goal is a one-two-three kind of thing, “life ain’t that easy, babe”. In fact, it may be that that “messy middle” is where we grow and learn about life, it is part f the who deal. After all, why would we have learned such phrases as “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” taught us as children?

 

Lessons learned

Maybe we are actually supposed to learn something about the process, about ourselves, about life in that middle part between the beginning and the goal. Brené Brown says that the messy middle is where the magic happens; what magic? I think the process should be called transformation. We need to think about what we want the future to be like and then plan for it, and act like it, even when we don’t see anything happening.

 

We are in a process of transformation

Each one of us is in process, in a movement towards where we want to go, who we want to be. We want to be there now, or even better, yesterday. But it takes time, and depending on the goal, it could take a lifetime. But each change starts with small steps, like spending fifteen minutes a day planning for your future, for your change and choosing something to work on- then, that day, that week. It means putting aside the tyranny of the urgent for the time being and focusing on the really important future goals, and spending time on reaching them.

 

Take your time

We also need to spend time focusing on ourselves as worthwhile human beings, focusing on our thoughts, feelings, actions. We need to find a way to integrate our lives and our goals, and make them whole, not compartments, but really whole. Who do I need to be to reach my goals? Do they fit my value system? What can I do for myself to help make me the person I want to be? Your action might be as simple as setting aside fifteen minutes a day for writing and reflection; it might be something completely different.

 

Questions, questions

What do I want my life to be like today, next year, in five years? What do I value most? Am I spending my time in a way that focuses on those values today? What do I need to change in my life, and activities to reflect my values?

 

Magic!

Brené Brown says that this messy time where “nothing seems to have changed” is where the magic happens. Maybe this messy time is where seeds are planted that, in turn become trees and crops to feed you for the rest of your life. Maybe the time is more like a winter season where all the leaves have fallen off your tree and you think it is dead, but actually the roots have reached even deeper and the tree is stronger after a restful winter where “nothing seems” to have happened.

 

Whatever the metaphor, the messy middle is part of a process that is unseen, and that can be frustrating for those of us who need to “see immediate results”. The process calls for patience, with ourselves, with the situation, and with others. None of that is easy.

 

For further reading, you might like this: https://hbr.org/2016/03/you-need-to-practice-being-your-future-self?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29

 

What are you going to do today to start yourself in the direction you want to end up in?

 

Happy messing around!

 

Patricia Jehle

www.jehle-coaching.com

Learning points

March 15th, 2016

What I have been learning these past few months:

I took a MOOC course with Stanford on-line recently called “Scaling up your Venture without Screwing up” and I found it very informative. I learned three main new ideas:

1) Business is a “ground war”

This means that, although vision and passion are great, every day hard work and persistence are key to business success. The daily chores of a business are not to be forgotten in the “ivory towers” of the CEO’s office, where dreams come true.

The vision and passion are what keeps the people going, but a ground war, where everyone is involved in the hard work of getting things going, keeping them going and moving towards scaling a business up, is what is the bread and butter of a company.

2) Pre-mortems are essential to change

Before one makes a change there should be a process of thinking ahead to the “what ifs”—What if t he scaling doesn’t succeed? What would/could happen to cause this? What else? And What more? Then what can be done to prevent these things from happening?

These questions can prevent failure and expensive re-inventing and re-tooling, etc.

3) Even the experts don’t know everything

Everyone, even the experts are learning and making mistakes—and then learning from their mistakes. Isn’t it a relief to know that it doesn’t matter that we make mistakes, as long as we learn from them, in the end. Not even pre-mortems can prevent all our mistakes from occurring. But we know, from history, that it is the getting back up, brushing yourself off and returning to that arena that makes you and your company a success.

What have you been learning lately?

Patricia Jehle

www.jehle-coaching.com   If you would like, you are invited to join my LinkedIn group: SMEs Grow Together

merger