Posts Tagged ‘hope’

Don’t just cry, DO Something!

August 15th, 2017

A walk can help you think

A Walk and a PLAN

This morning I had a walk with the dog and made a plan for the week, after shedding even more tears over the past weekend in Charlottesville. What can I do in light of the polarization and violence? What can we all do to bring about positive change? This week I will be doing most of these actions listed below, and if not this week, next week. Will you join me in some ACTION?

  • Hang our with people who are different from you

The mere fact you are learning from someone with differences will make you more open, and a better person. Mostly listen, don’t preach or teach.

  • Give of your time

Volunteer- at your local refugee office, at your homeless center, at the free meal service at the church down the street (the one I know of in St. Paul is called “Loaves and Fishes”), do whatever.

  • Give of your money

Put your money where your mouth (or tears) is

  • State your pain and speak out

Call your local representative, write letters, go to meetings, say prayers with others.

  • Join a group of bridge-builders

One of the things that helps positive change most, is to intentionally meet up with people who want to make a peaceful difference and build bridges between differences.

  • Cry if and when you need to

Tears of anger, of sadness, of grief, of repentance. We need to repent of our silence. We need to speak out and do something, for our world, but for ourselves, too.

Benefits of tears: go ahead and cry first

Besides being precious tears are important for health. We cry to release intense feelings, but also the body is able to rid itself of impurities. Tears are also important for emotional health. Then after a good cry or two, take action.

So, are you sad about, grieving about Charlottesville? What your you going to do about it?

I wish you a good week, thinking, feeling, and taking action.

 

Patricia Jehle

www.jehle-coaching.com     blog: www.jehle-coachingexpat.com

contact me at: patricia@jehle-coaching.com

 

Also, if you are a SME owner or leader, I invite you to join my group, “SMEs Grow Together” on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7041402

 

Joy, Hope and Beauty

June 5th, 2017

My life is full and busy with positive activities full of joy hope and beauty.

Wedding of an octogenarian widow

This past weekend my husband and I attended a wedding and it was really very special. The groom is a (80+ year old) friend of ours who lost his wife a few years back, and the bride is a long-time friend of the both the husband and (his deceased) wife. This wedding gives me, and many people, hope – such positive expectations for life, and a plan for a future together makes me so joyful!

celebrations, especially weddings, give me joy

Meetings meetings meetings, but good ones!

Not all meetings are bad and last Friday I attended a mid-term project meeting of some students that was quite positive. This week I have a few more meetings that I am really looking forward to, and soon I will be starting some brand new coaching sessions with new clients, too. This all gives me quite some energy!

Holidays, short and long (TI and Pentecost)

Switzerland celebrates the moveable feasts. Over Ascension a friend and I went to the Ticino where we enjoyed the weather, lovely architecture and people, the mountains and Lake Lugano. It was a relaxing time of fun. This weekend is Pentecost and we have Monday off, I hope for a day trip somewhere with another new friend.

Visitors!

Going with visitors to places that I enjoy has always been fun: castles, the Alsace, the Black Forest, the Ticino, and the Bremgarten WhitSun market are some that I have been to recently with visitors from abroad. Fun, beauty and good food rolled into a package of hanging out with great people.

Books!

I have been reading again. I have enjoyed quite a number of books late, but my reading list is as long as ever. Besides Henry Cloud’s Integrity, I am reading The Resilience Factor by Dr. Karen Reivich and Dr. Andrew Shatté and Ps. Ich Lebe Gern by Heinz and Ann Zindel – and some historical novels to keep me entertained… What are you reading?

What are you reading?

Art and Museums

One of my new friends and I have a tradition of attending art museums together. I enjoy the exhibits, and my friend is adept in modern art and can help me enjoy and understand it better. We will be attending a museum exhibit this week, and I am so looking forward to it! Another friend sells sculptures – and she has an open day on Saturday, and … Need I say more?

Writing

I continue to write and am considering finishing one of my rough drafts this summer and a second one in the fall. They are both almost done, but would take quite some refining. Besides that, I have found myself a new writers’ group that is closer than Geneva and am hoping for some support from them.

Coffee with friends

Finally, on Saturday after that lovely wedding we had coffee at an “old” friend’s place and a good talk. It is great to connect with people and to have important discussions with them. I look forward to one or two more of those discussions in the near future with some other friends.

What makes your life full and joyful? What have you been up to? I wish you a positive week full of joy, hope and beauty!

Patricia Jehle

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

patricia@jehle-coaching.com

 

A Long Way

April 3rd, 2017

You’ve come a long way, baby!

I have come a long way from a decade ago. I bet you have, too! We have come a long way, baby!

Twelve years ago my father-in-law was quite ill with liver cancer and we often visited him in Baden. He passed on in December of 2005. Today I walked past his house, now owned by someone else and being beautifully renovated at this very moment.

 

A walk of remembering

The walk brought back a flood of memories of – mostly – good times in that house. I’ve always thought it a wonderful house, full of good folk, great memories.

 

But this morning I was walking on this street to visit my OBGYN for my annual check-up. She has recently moved into a private practice down the street from my in-laws’ old place. Funny. Sad. Interesting. Coincidence? Maybe.

 

Eleven years ago we, my husbands’ siblings and their families, cleaned out and sold my in-laws’ house just as I was diagnosed with breast cancer. That was when I got to know my most favorite OBGYN and favorite gynecological surgeon, still working as a team today. I got to see them both today and it felt good; it felt right to see them there today after walking by the house where my husband spent his teenage years, where my babies visited their grandparents.

 

Celebrating more than ten years!

Later I will celebrate over ten years of being cancer free, of coming a long way. I am very grateful!

 

After surgery and chemotherapy in 2006, I spent a few years recovering my stamina, getting my bearings and deciding what to do with this new view of my life. Having a serious illness often makes one reflect on their life and direction. In some ways, I am continuing in the same direction, in others, I am changing it, a little.

 

I still read and write, now more than ever- but with more intention, too. I have a Spiritual Direction certification and see my own spiritual director, something which I have wanted to do for a long time. Now I just do it; I make the time for it. I still teach and I really enjoy it, now adding my own specialties to what I teach in the classroom.

 

Namely, I add coaching, as I have become a certified business coach and presently am looking to upgrade to Master Coach and Supervisor soon. All those activities and choices have come out of the reflection on my life after being so ill.

 

Reflect on you life

And you, you don’t have to have such a dramatic reason to reflect. You can just take some time and think about you life, where you have been, where you are (your “red dot”), and where you want to go now. Or tonight, if now is not a good time.

 

Celebrating my – and your – “red dot”

Part of my celebration today will be a walk in the springy countryside where I live, sitting on a bench and enjoying my dog (acquired to keep me healthy), listening to the birds. I will take that time to continue to reflect on where I have been and be thankful for where I am now.

 

You can do that, too. In your home, on a walk, at a special place set aside for such reflecting and celebrating. Wherever you want. But you should take some time and reflect on your life and examine it, your “why”, so to speak. Then celebrate on how far you have come. It will do you a lot of good, I promise.

 

Have a great time doing it!

 

Patricia Jehle, Jehle Coaching

 

www.jehle-coaching.com or write me at patricia@jehle-caoching.com

House renovation of my father-in-law’s place

I stand with Refugees

February 9th, 2017

Where do you stand?

 

I wrote this blog almost two years ago, but it bears reposting at the moment. I have changed very little but the paragraph at the end is new.

Refugees are human beings with human rights, needs, fears, and a lot of bravery. #Istandwithrefugees

***

I am in the USA and recently had the opportunity of flying on a very special flight to Chicago.

 

My Confusion

The Zürich-Chicago flight was half-full and I was tired because of my early rising to be “on time” for arrival at the airport. Hurry up and wait is the motto of flying, especially internationally.

 

Because I was bleary-eyed, the group Swiss was boarding (they always board groups early) looked to me like a band or choir. Their uniforms were obviously African in dress and their skin tone matched the traditional dress of the women. The men wore more western clothing, but it was all the same. I was rather confused as to why so many small children, also in the same clothing, were flying with the band/choir.

 

Freedom

Upon boarding I was pleased to note that I had a free seat next to me and spread out accordingly, getting comfortable, starting to watch “The Theory of Everything” when the African gentleman from the choir across the aisle from me asked what to do with the customs card. I was free, having nothing to do for nine hours ahead of me, so I was happy to help.

 

Clarification

After pausing the movie and taking off my headphones, I started to explain the reason for the card and then what was required in each box: name, flight, and passport. When we got to passport part, the young man was a bit concerned. I showed him my passport to illustrate and he shook his head. He had no passport, “just” a bag with him, which he showed me. The bag was printed with something like, “International Migration Services”.

 

Well, by then I had figured it out. There were about three dozen brave refugees on board, flying to the USA for a new life.

 

I felt privileged to be able to vicariously experience their arrival in a country where they would not have to live in a war zone. The man, a father with two little boys, was traveling with his wife to Chicago first and then to Florida. In Chicago the group would break up and go on to the places where they had sponsors. I still think often of these people and their bravery.

 

Bravery

The family had already experienced many firsts on their journey from Guinea to Tanzania via Nairobi and then from Tanzania to Chicago via Zurich: new clothes (they were all dressed alike because of the IRC -International Refugee Committee- donations and thus I thought they were a musical group), flying on an airplane, so many Caucasians around them, new food, new language, new climate.

 

The refugees would also be experiencing many more firsts soon, ones not always so positive. I felt for this man, for his wife and kids, for all the others. The list of new challenges they will encounter can go on forever, but their fear of the new was overridden by the fear of what they had left. They had left a war zone. The father said, “Whatever is ahead is better than being killed, seeing your children killed.”

 

Lessons learned

I can learn from this man; we all can. He has already been able to overcome what seems to me to be insurmountable barriers. He was able to make important, if very hard, decisions, and to continue on his way to a new solution, a new place.

 

He had few illusions to the difficulties he would face ahead, but he believed that there was opportunity ahead and only death and destruction behind. He knows that his future is in his hands and he has taken the responsibility seriously.

 

Today, 21 months later

I wish I knew what has happened to this little family of four. Are they still in Florida? Have they been accepted? Are they on some awful list to be deported. Only God knows. It breaks my heart to see the way the refugee stories are playing out at the moment. I hope it breaks yours, too.

 

May you be able to face the difficult moments and make brave decisions.

My coaching website can be found at www.jehle-coaching.com

You can write me at patricia@jehle-coaching.com

Refugee children at play

Waiting can be good for us…

June 21st, 2016

Waiting

 

I am waiting. Waiting for summer to really arrive, in more ways than one. Waiting for (hopefully good) news on many fronts, including Brexit, too.

 

Having lived about half my life in a country where Memorial Day, is the “beginning of summer”. I have always felt that mid-July is way too late for summer vacation, for my, my husband’s and the kids’ holidays, to begin. Here in Switzerland, June is a school month.

 

After all, one should be able to experience the solstice today and not worry about school. But no, there are tests to take (and/or correct) and meetings to attend well past that wonderfully wistful date of the midnight sun. Here it’s around 10pm or so when the sun sets and we have these great new Adirondack chairs to sit in and watch it.

 

So I am waiting for summer holidays to begin, but it looks like a long four weeks for us Jehles.

 

Except for my middle child, who has finished taking his high school (gymnasium) final exams – a process of something like a month. Now he has two weeks to go as he is waiting for a different kind of beginning: The Swiss Military Recruit Training School. He is looking forward to about five months of no studying but instead learning all sorts of new skills that have little to do with academia.

 

I am also waiting for the rain to stop. Perhaps you know of the flooding going on in greater Europe. Well, it’s raining here, too.

 

But I guess what I am really waiting for is for life to calm down and the summer heat to overwhelm us all so we become incredibly lazy, drink iced tea and eat ice cream, but maybe not in that order.

 

We have our new Adirondack chairs — and my husband is expecting for us to spend evenings in them, drinking cool drinks and listening to the crickets. I love crickets, and there’s one nearby. I hear it when I walk the dog, who also seems to be waiting for summer to arrive.

 

As a child growing up in the US, I remember endless days of iced tea, books and sitting in the shade. Of fishing and swimming lessons, and then going swimming again in the afternoon, even if we’d had lessons. I am waiting once again for that kind of day where the to-do list is non-existent and all I need to do is remember to eat. And get dressed: A real vacation.

 

But now I wait, at least another four weeks and then we will see what (the rest of the) summer brings.

 

I think I heard this somewhere and I believe it: Waiting is actually good for us humans; it gives us something to hope for, to look forward to. A famous man wrote that hope does not disappoint us. I think he was right. Hope and planning causes us almost as much joy as the actual activity, anyway. Hmmm. So waiting can be very positive.

 

What are you waiting for? What are you hoping for? How are you waiting, perhaps proactively?

 

Patricia Jehle

Regional Director at the Alpha Group, Switzerland and Coach

 

www.jehle-coaching.com

 

waiting

Hope in the midst of job cuts

January 19th, 2016

Today I am sad and I am angry

 

BIG JOB CUTS

A week ago the local newspaper said that the recent “friendly takeover” of a French company by a US-based multinational with lots of our local people working for it would be “letting go” of 1,300 of them in our city. Those people are my friends and neighbors, people who have families, and mostly people who now need to find jobs in an already tough market.

 

Who has to pick up the pieces? The government? Can they really afford to help so many out at one time? How will this affect the local economy, anyway? Certainly the multinational firing so many people has no interest in the future of these employees and their families, and probably not in our local economy, either.

 

What can I do about it?

 

Protest

I could go and demonstrate. The local union will be holding a demonstration soon regarding the job cuts. I think demonstrations help, and I have joined in some over the years, but I wonder if I could be of more help in some other way. A way that I feel has an impact on the situation.

 

Write

I could write a letter to the editor. In some ways, I am doing that with this blog, and perhaps it will help. Maybe, maybe not. But at least I feel better writing about it. It’s kind of like venting.

 

Buy local

I have and will continue to find ways to support local businesses and the local economy, as that is a way that I feel empowered myself, and can empower and encourage local people. Small businesses help the local economy where large multinationals tend to suck it dry, and fire my friends and neighbors.

 

The Alpha Group as a solution

And I will continue to use The Alpha Group as a way to support local businesses, as the group promises to double the value of the business within three years. These are the things I can do, and though it may not directly help those 1,300 families, perhaps it will help create some jobs for them in the long run. We have a group starting in Zürich and one, hopefully, soon in Baden and these will support SME business leaders, the local people.

 

In all these ways I feel like I can help out- maybe you are thinking and feeling similar things. What will you do to help the local economy where you live?

 

Hopefully yours,

Patricia Jehle patricia@jehle-coaching.com   www.jehle-coaching.com